Quick Answer: Can You Force A Neighbour To Cut Down A Tree?

How tall can my Neighbours trees be?

2 or more mostly evergreen or semi-evergreen trees or shrubs.

over 2 metres tall.

affecting your enjoyment of your home or garden because it’s too tall..

Can I sue my neighbor if his dead tree falls on my house?

You could be held liable if your tree was dying or already dead before it fell on your neighbor’s property, and you did nothing to prevent property damage. In this case, your insurance carrier would have to cover the repairs.

Can I throw my Neighbours leaves back?

You Can’t Blow Leaves Onto Your Neighbor’s Property However, if leaves or other debris fall onto your property, they are yours to eliminate. … You have to clean up everything on your property and dispose of it properly (meaning not on someone else’s side).

Can I throw neighbors tree branches back in their yard?

Yes, they can. Your tree was most likely encroaching over your neighbor’s property so they cut it back. They don’t have to haul the branches away, because it’s your tree. Also, should a windstorm blow your tree down on your neighbor’s property then you’re liable for damages.

What happens if I cut down a tree without permission?

To summarize California law: Tree cutting now has three measures of damages: “(1) for willful and malicious cutting, the court may impose treble damages but must impose double damages; (2) for casual and involuntary tree cutting, the court must impose double damages; and (3) for trespass under legal authority (e.g. …

How do you secretly kill a neighbor’s tree?

To do this undetected you would need to hammer the nails into the roots, remove a piece of bark and hammer nails and glue the bark back to the tree or build a tree fort or attach a sign to the tree using copper nails instead of steel.

How do you stop a pine tree from growing taller?

To prune your pine trees, simply pinch back the new growth, called candles, seen in the spring. It’s best to do this by hand. If you use pruning shears to cut the new growth, you could end up cutting into the needles of the trees, leaving them to turn brown.

The height of fences is a matter of planning policy. To find out what is allowed in your area contact the local authority planning office. As a general rule, fences in rear gardens are allowed to be up to 2 metres high.

What can you do about Neighbours overhanging trees?

You can cut back any overhanging branch that comes into your property. However, the cut branch(es), and any fruit or flowers attached to the branch(es) remain the property of the tree owner and must be returned. If the tree has a Preservation Order on it then you cannot cut/pare any branches.

Who is responsible for a tree overhanging?

Even if the tree trunk is on your neighbor’s property, you have the responsibility for cutting any branches that extend onto your property line. You are responsible for the cost of cutting any branches you choose to trim. You can cut back anything up to your property line.

How do I complain about a Neighbours overgrown garden?

If weeds or brambles and the like in a neighbour’s garden are causing problems on your side of the property boundary, it can amount to a nuisance which you can report to the Environmental Health Department of your local council who can pursue legal action. More information can be found in the Weeds Act 1959.

Who pays if neighbor’s tree falls on house?

If your tree falls on your neighbor’s house, the basic (and almost always applied) rule is that the insurance policy of the property that was damaged pays for the loss. In other words, if your tree falls on your neighbor’s house, your neighbor’s homeowner’s insurance covers the damage to your neighbor’s house.

What to do if a Neighbour’s tree is affecting you?

If your neighbor’s tree is encroaching on your property, attempt to resolve the problem with a friendly conversation. If that fails, you may have to contact the local government or take your neighbor to court to address the issue.

Can you ask Neighbours to cut trees down?

You have a common law right to prune back parts of a tree or hedge growing over the boundary into your property (subject to any legal restrictions being overcome first such as Tree Preservation Orders or conservation areas) but you cannot compel the owner of the trees or hedge to carry out this work or pay for it.